RATS WHO ENABLE – Parody of Cats in the Cradle

posted in: Political Parody | 3

Lyrics by David Cohen – Performance by Don Caron
And the rats who enable this pathetic loon – a carnival barker and complete buffoon
“When you want me home, Vlad?” You don’t say when . . .
But you’ll get some kompromat then. I’m sure you’ll get some kompromat then.




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LYRICS to RATS WHO ENABLE
David Cohen

A bully arrived on a mid-June day
Into a country he would later betray
There were judges to buy, and schemes to weigh
He learned to lie almost right away
And he was squawkin’ ‘fore we knew it, and as he grew
He’d say “I wanna be like you, Vlad
You know I wanna be like you”

And the rats who enable this pathetic loon
A carnival barker and complete buffoon
“When you want me home, Vlad?”
You don’t say when
But you’ll get some kompromat then
I’m sure you’ll get some kompromat then

This bum sends tributes to his mentors each day
Says, “Thanks for the loan, Vlad, I’m on my way.”
Will you teach me the ropes, Kim? Not today
You got a lot to do and more debts to pay
So he waddles away ‘cause his girth won’t slim
And thinks “I wanna be like Kim, yeah
You know I wanna be like Kim”

And the rats who enable this pathetic loon
A carnival barker and complete buffoon
“When you want me home, Vlad?”
You don’t say when
But you’ll get some kompromat then
I’m sure you’ll get some kompromat then

Well, he came from college after just one day
His low IQ got him turned away
“Son, you know that’s true, can’t you try for a while?”
He shook his head, and said “Not my style! ”
What I really want, Dad, is my inheritance please
See ya later, just buy the degrees

And the rats who enable this pathetic loon
A carnival barker and complete buffoon
“When you want me home, Vlad?”
You don’t say when
But you’ll get some kompromat then
I’m sure you’ll get some kompromat then

He’s been long since fired but continues to stay
His lackeys call a thousand times a day
They say, “I’d like your backing if you don’t mind”
He says, “give it a rest, I don’t have the time”
You see, the trials are a hassle and my bail is due
“So it’s not worth talkin’ to you, man
It’s not worth talkin’ to you”

And as he slammed down the phone, you could easily see
He loves the “I“ not we
His favorite word is “me”

And the rats who enable this pathetic loon
A carnival barker and complete buffoon
“When you want me home, Vlad?”
You don’t say when
But you’ll get some kompromat then
I’m sure you’ll get some kompromat then

ABOUT the ORIGINAL SONG
“Cat’s in the Cradle” is a folk rock song by American singer-songwriter Harry Chapin, from his fourth studio album, Verities & Balderdash (1974). The single topped the US Billboard Hot 100 in December 1974. As Chapin’s only number-one song, it became the best known of his work and a staple for folk rock music. Chapin’s recording of the song was nominated for the 1975 Grammy Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance and was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2011.

“Cat’s in the Cradle” is narrated by a man who becomes a father in the first verse. He is repeatedly too busy with his work to spend time with his son, despite his son looking up to him and promising he will grow up to be just like him. When the son graduates from college, he declines his father’s offer to relax with him and instead asks for the car keys. In the final verse, the now-retired father calls his adult son and asks to spend some time together, but the son is now too busy with his own work and family to spend time with his dad, and the father realizes his son has indeed grown up to be just like him.

The song’s lyrics began as a poem written by Chapin’s wife, Sandra “Sandy” Gaston; the poem itself was inspired by the awkward relationship between her first husband, James Cashmore, and his father, John, a politician who served as Brooklyn borough president. She was also inspired by a country music song she had heard on the radio. Chapin also said the song was about his own relationship with his son, Josh, admitting, “Frankly, this song scares me to death.”

Cash Box called it “a tender story of a father and his son and a perfect representation of how roles change in the relationship over the years,” stating it was a “lyrical delight.” Record World said that the song “deals with the preoccupations plaguing parenthood” and that it “bridges the generation gap by pointing up mutual faults.”

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3 Responses

  1. Greg Trafidlo

    Don,

    This is flat out brilliant!

    ‘Covers a lot of territory and does so superbly.

    Best,

    Greg