FOLLOWING THE LAW-LAW-LAW-LAW-LAW – Trump Parody – Deck the Halls | Don Caron

posted in: Christmas Songs, Trump Parodies | 2

Just a bit of Christmas fun at the expense of TFG. Parody of Deck the Halls written and performed by Don Caron
Executive Producers Don Caron and Jerry Pender




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LYRICS to FOLLOWING THE LAW-LAW-LAW-LAW-LAW
Don Caron

He is simply too near-sighted
It’s his fatal flaw, law, law, law, law
Could have avoided being indicted
by following the law, law, law, law, law

Claims no insurrection happened
just a quiet little brawl, brawl, brawl, brawl
Claims he’d still be president
But Michael Pence dropped the ball, ball, ball

Stealing national documents
They caught him holding those in his right paw
Prompting many of us to say
Surely that’s the final straw, straw, straw

Didn’t want to be deplumed So he said he had returned all, all, all
Then he moved them to the bathroom
and hid them in a stall, stall, stall, stall, stall

They say the protest was all peaceful But we know just what we saw, saw, sawHe lied and fooled so many people
So the voting count would stall, stall, stall

The country’s full of foolish people
For him they took the fall, fall, fall, fall
Lied to all his mindless sheeple
Now they’re lookin’ at a prison wall
Soon he’ll be lookin’ at a prison wall.

ABOUT THE ORIGINAL SONG
Deck the Halls

“Deck the Halls” is a traditional Christmas carol. The melody is Welsh, dating back to the sixteenth century, and belongs to a winter carol, “Nos Galan”, while the English lyrics, written by the Scottish musician Thomas Oliphant, date to 1862.

In the original 1862 publication, Oliphant’s English lyrics were published alongside Talhaiarn’s Welsh lyrics. Although some early sources state that Oliphant’s words were a translation of Talhaiarn’s Welsh original, this is not the case in any strict or literal sense. The first verse in Welsh, together with a literal English translation taken from Campbell’s Treatise on the language, poetry, and music of the Highland Clans (1862), is given for comparison:

Goreu pleser ar nos galan,
Tŷ a thân a theulu diddan,
Calon lân a chwrw melyn,
Pennill mwyn a llais y delyn,

The best pleasure on new year’s eve,
Is house and fire and a pleasant family,
A pure heart and blonde ale,
A gentle song and the voice of the harp

The melody of “Deck the Hall” is taken from “Nos Galan” (“New Year’s Eve”), a traditional Welsh New Year’s Eve carol published in 1794, although it is much older. In 1912, Ruth Herbert Lewis made a wax cylinder recording of a Welshman named Benjamin Davies singing a song, “Can y Coach faier”, which uses the old melody now associated with “Deck the Halls”. The recording can be heard on the British Library Sound Archive website.

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